Lane Etiquette

Lane Etiquette

 

Keep left

  • Start, swim and finish on the left, keeping as close to the left lane rope as possible.
  • Then move across to the right so others can finish at the wall.
  • Turn on centre markings (the black lines) when possible.
  • If resting, move to the sides of the lane so others can still turn.

Safety First

  • To prevent scratching other swimmers, avoid wearing rings with protruding stones, or turn them inwards.
  • Fastest goes first.
  • In the middle of a set, check when other swimmers are going to start their next lap to avoid pushing off in front of them.
  • Generally, leave at least a five-second interval between swimmers during sets and repetitions. This gives swimmers room to navigate the lane, especially on turns.
  • Be aware of how many swimmers are in your lane and how fast they are going.
  • Due to narrow lanes at ABH, there should be no overtaking. If you find yourself being “toe-tickled” by the swimmer behind stop at the at the next turn, so long as it is safe to do so, move across to the right and allow them to pass.  If unsafe or impractical to stop, consider changing the swim order for the next rep or maybe even your lane (see below).
  • Swim in the lane appropriate to your current ability.
  • Try to keep your own count on sets and repetitions.
  • Use the clock.

Swimmers have a responsibility to:

  • Observe lane etiquette.
  • Respect the coach and listen while instructions are being given.
  • Communicate with the coach if they are injured, have a medical condition, or are tired, exhausted or excessively distressed by the training session.
  • Notify the coach if they leave the pool before the training session is completed.
  • Communicate any health concerns and emergency medical conditions to the coach. This information will help the coach to individualise workouts and ensure safe participation.
  • If there is a temporary change in medical condition during the year (e.g. pregnancy) inform the coach(es).

The relationship between coaches and swimmers:

  • Coaches have a responsibility to be sensitive to the very wide spectrum of ability, health, strength and endurance of our swimmers, thus they should:

o Respect those swimmers who wish to merely train for fun and fitness and allow them to do so without undue distress (including not forcing swimmers to complete sets when they are tired).

o Respect those swimmers who wish to train harder for competition and allow them to do so.

o Recognise exhausted and injured swimmers.